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July 14, 2011

Enema Ads in 1920

by Kristina Amelong

It is December 18th, 1920. Imagine sitting in a well-worn armchair next to a wood-burning stove, snow just beginning to fall outside the window. On your lap is a Saturday Evening Post, America’s most influential and beloved magazine. You spent a nickel to secure your copy.

First, you admire the fine artwork by Ruth Eastman - a woman donning a red hat made of feathers, looking down at her watch, ice skates tucked under her left arm. Yes, the Norman Rockwell illustration of the boy pushing the baby carriage while being teased by two other boys in red and white baseball caps was your favorite, but the reds in her hat and on her cheeks and the grace of her fingers and gaze were admirable.

Instead of lifting the cover to view the table of contents, your thumb slips into the center pages of the magazine, igniting your imagination with the potential for a short story by F. Scott Fitzgerald. You had loved Bernice Bobs Her Hair in the May issue of the magazine. After all, it was about a girl from Eau Claire, Wisconsin, who sneaks into her cousin Marjorie’s room and cuts off her pigtails, throwing them onto the porch of a boy. You were also hoping for an article on prohibition, a new serial, or more pictures of the Essex automobile, an affordably priced enclosed passenger car you were hoping to soon own.

When you open the magazine, however, you find more of the color red: a full-sized ad from the Faultless Rubber Company. You recognize the familiar fountain syringe because you have seen it in your neighbor’s bathrooms, but you have never "cleaned" your body. Yet, you have been feeling a bit run down lately, so you read the ad:

"Because keeping the body clean inside will prevent much of the sickness in every home..."

"Protects the health of all the family from Baby to Baby’s grandparents..."

"Known from one end of the country to the other for the splendid satisfaction it gives its users..."


You make a note to pick one up at the druggist the next time you are in town. You
turn the page, eagerly beginning Lizard by Rita Weiman.

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July 12, 2011

Water Tips for Taking an Enema

by Kristina Amelong

Use high-quality water. Always remove the chlorine: reverse osmosis, carbon filtering, and distillation water filtration systems are a few choices.

Learn more about safe and unsafe enema solutions

Use a thermometer so you know that the water temperature is between 96 and 103 degrees Fahrenheit. If the water is too cold, you are more likely cramp. If the water is too hot, you could burn the tissues of the colon.

Add sea salt to your enema water to assist the body to maintain healthy electrolyte levels. Use 1 teaspoon of Celtic Sea Salt per quart of water. To assure adequate levels of electrolytes in your body, have a hair tissue mineral analysis (HTMA) done seasonally.

Add essential oils to the your enema water. Using essential oils in your enema water will improve your colon cleansing experience; ample scientific evidence exists that the colon is a more effective delivery system for therapeutic agents than the mouth.

The colon can hold up to 4 quarts of warm water. When filling the colon with water, go slowly - close the enema clamp often. However, if you find your body can only take in 1 quart of water, that is just fine too. The smaller your body is, the less water you will be able to take into your colon.

To learn more, view Small Volume Enemas and Large Volume Enemas.

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July 7, 2011

Cats, Dogs, and Enemas

by Kristina Amelong

Recently, while answering the phone at work, I discovered that some of our happiest customers are veterinarians.

The phone rang. I answered it. "Hello, Optimal Health Center,” I chimed.

“Could you please help me place an order for some of your enema equipment?” the caller asked.

“Sure!” Upon finding her customer number, I noticed she had ordered from us multiple times and that her orders always consisted of 10 to 20 infant bulb syringes, 5 to 10 two-and-a-half quart clear enema bag kits, and 5 to 10 flex tip enema nozzles junior.

“Hmmm, thanks for your past orders. What can I help you to order today?” I offered.

“I would like 10 infant bulb syringes, 10 two-and-a-half quart clear enema bags, and 10 small enema nozzles,” she told me.

“Do you own an alternative health clinic?” I asked.

“No,” she said, laughing. “I am a veterinarian. We use this enema equipment with some of the cats and dogs that come to the clinic, especially the cats.”

“Wow, cats and dogs get enemas at veterinary clinics?” I asked in surprise. I thought I was up on the many regular uses of enemas, but I was abruptly realizing that there was a whole area of enema use that I wasn’t familiar with.

“Yes, pets become constipated for many reasons and respond well to enemas. As I said before, especially cats. We give enemas daily to pets here.” Her matter-of-fact tone on the issue of giving pets enemas and my inner awe made me laugh out loud.

“Well, I will have to let others know that cats and dogs sometimes need enemas too.”

It turns out that a handful of veterinary clinics order enema equipment from OptimalHealthNetwork.com.

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